JUNE 2000

MEETING NOTICE The June meeting will be on Sunday, June 18th at the Woodring Terminal building at 2:30.

MAY MEETING The meeting was held at Mica Doane’s. At 1:00, Steve Dortch and his Youth Group came for their Young Eagles Flights. Thanks to all who helped in this, it was a good day for flights and the kids had a great time. THANK YOU Mica and Brenda Doane for allowing us to have our party and give the Young Eagle Flights at your place!! We always have a good time and appreciate you having us all out. It was a good day and I’m sure all the planes, plus quite a few pilots were glad when the sun set. If the bugs on the RV are any indication of the fun we had, it was a blast! The brisket was great and all the food the members brought accented it well. Thanks to all who made this possible.

A.C.E.-------AERO CLUB OF ENID Bill Blunk. The Aero Club of Enid will meet on the second Sunday each month 2:00 at the Barnstormer Restaurant. Bill Blunk 233-1882 .

B-17 ALUMINUM OVERCAST June 19-22 will be hosted by Ponca City Chapter 1046. Rides are available the mornings of Tuesday and Wednesday the 20and 21. It will cost $300 for EAA members and $350 for nonmembers. The plane will be on display in the afternoons for static display tours on the 20 and 21. Contact Steve McGuire at MCGUIRES@PONCACITY.COM or 580-762-6986.

 

YOUNG EAGLES FLIGHTS Thursday July 13th at 9:30, will be the day our Chapter will be giving rides in conjunction with the Sooner Flight Academy. Please contact Bill if this will be acceptable.

 

AVWEB BRAINTEASER: EMERGENCIES according to FARs, AIM, Advisory Circulars, some are strictly pilot judgement.

You're receiving ATC radar traffic advisories while flying along in beautiful VFR at 4500' MSL over flat, sea-level terrain in a Cessna 172, and you notice that you've had to increase the throttle in order to maintain cruise RPM setting. Even at full throttle, the RPM begins to decline. Your initial action should be to
a. switch to the emergency frequency, 121.5, and tell ATC about your loss of power.
b. notifiy ATC on your current frequency about your loss of power.
c. lean the mixture.
d. apply full carburetor heat.
e. look for a precautionary landing site.

2. You're receiving ATC radar traffic advisories while flying along in beautiful VFR at 4500' over flat, sea-level terrain in a Cessna 172, and you notice that the oil pressure is dropping and the oil temperature is increasing. Your initial action should be to:
a. switch to the emergency frequency, 121.5, and tell ATC about your oil pressure/temperature problem.
b. notify ATC on your current frequency about your oil pressure/temperature problem.
c. lean the mixture.
d. apply full carburetor heat.
e. look for a precautionary landing site.

3. While approaching a controlled airport for the purpose of landing, you are asked to circle outside the traffic pattern in order to give priority to a "Lifeguard" flight. A "Lifeguard" flight is one which
a. is a traffic watch aircraft for a local radio or television station .
b. is experiencing an inflight emergency situation.
c. is experiencing an inflight abnormal situation.
d. is an amphibious aircraft making a landing on a hard surfaced runway.
e. usually concerns the transportation of urgently needed lifesaving medical materials or vital organs.

 

4. Although the frequency in use or other frequencies assigned by ATC are preferable, the following emergency frequencies can be used for distress or urgency communications, if necessary or desirable:
a. 121.5 KHz and 243.0 KHz.
b. 2182 MHz
c. 121.5 MHz, 243.0 MHz, and 2182 KHz

 

5. Which of the actions listed below should a pilot in a distress or urgency condition consider NOT correct?
a. Climb, if possible, for improved communications, and better radar and direction finding detection.
b. If equipped with a radar beacon transponder, continue squawking assigned MODE A/3 discrete code/VFR code and MODE C altitude encoding when in radio contact with an air traffic facility or other agency providing air traffic services, unless instructed to do otherwise.
c. If unable to immediately establish communications with an air traffic facility/agency, squawk MODE A/3, Code 7700/Emergency and MODE C.
d. Transmit a distress or urgency message: If distress, MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY; if urgency, PAN-PAN, PAN-PAN, PAN-PAN.
e. All of the above actions are correct for a pilot in a distress or urgency condition.

 

6. Your fuel supply has reached a state where, upon reaching destination, you cannot accept any undue delay. You should notify ATC of
a. an urgency situation.
b. a distress situation.
c. an advisory that indicates an emergency situation is possible should any undue delay occur.

 

7. The proper way to notify ATC of your situation as described in question #6 is to state
a. "lowest legal fuel reserve."
b. "minimum fuel."
c. your remaining fuel in minutes.
d. your remaining fuel in pounds.

8. You've just departed a tower controlled airport on a 4000' hard surfaced runway, when the engine in your C-172 quits. Your first priority should be to:
a. Notify the tower about your engine failure.
b. Change to the emergency frequency (121.5).
c. Squawk 7700.
d. Lower the nose to maintain a safe airspeed.

 

9. While flying under VFR in your twin-engine Cessna 310, you lose power on one engine and shut it down. You are still 200 NM from your home airport where you normally have your maintenance done. Which of the following is a true statement?
a. this is not an emergency, since the airplane is capable of flying on one engine. You may continue your flight to your home airport, and may overfly other suitable airports.
b. an engine failure in a twin-engine aircraft is an emergency, and you must notify ATC as soon as practical.
c. an engine failure in a twin-engine aircraft is an emergency, and you must discontinue the flight as soon as practical.

 

10. While flying at night under VFR, you inadvertently find yourself in IMC. Since you're instrument rated and current, and the aircraft is instrument equipped, and you're at an altitude that's well above the minimum IFR altitude, you feel confident in your ability to sort out this situation. What you should do is
a. call the nearest ATC facility and report your position and flight conditions.
b. get yourself out of the IMC without calling ATC. Since you're not on an IFR flight plan, and it's not an emergency (due to you and the aircraft being capable of flight in IMC), ATC doesn't want to hear from you. If you do call them, there'll be an endless amount of paperwork, and possibly an FAA violation against you.
c. turn your transponder to "standby" and make an immediate 180 degree turn.

 

ANSWERS: 1.D 2.E 3.E 4.C 5.E 6.C 7.B 8.D 9.C 10.A

LOOK OUT, DAVE CHAEL HAS A PLANE!! After 11 long years hiatus, Dave is the proud owner of a N35JW, 1959 Beech K Model 35 Bonanza. Needs lots of TLC but flies great!

(I smell an article, Dave.)

 

EMAIL SAVINGS Did you know that by sending our Newsletters by email that we are saving our Chapter $185 for a year? I am able to send it to more Chapters now than before without costing us, plus I can also send it to National Headquarters, a requirement, via email. Pretty slick, huh?! Please let me know if you are interested in receiving your Newsletter by email if you haven’t already responded. You’ll get it quicker too. Plus, any email that Syd and I receive concerning airplanes could be forwarded to you also. We get a few Chapters Newsletters by email and they could be shared.

QUICK WIT:

"Flight 1234," the center controller advised, "turn right 45 degrees for noise abatement."

"Roger," the pilot responded, "but we’re at 35,000 feet. How much noise can we make up here?"

"Sir," the radar man replied, "have you ever heard the noise a 727 makes when it hits a 747?"